Catalog Home Page

Movement ecology of the three species of threatened black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris, Calyptorhynchus baudinii, Calyptorhynchus banksii naso) endemic to Western Australia: Implications for the species’ conservation management

Rycken, Sam Johan Eduard (2019) Movement ecology of the three species of threatened black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris, Calyptorhynchus baudinii, Calyptorhynchus banksii naso) endemic to Western Australia: Implications for the species’ conservation management. PhD thesis, Murdoch University.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Whole Thesis
Download (4MB) | Preview

Abstract

Historically it has been difficult to gain information on the movement ecology of psittacine species in Australia. Using a novel double-tagging telemetry method, this research, aimed to: investigate regional differences in movement of the three black cockatoo species endemic to Western Australia; identify key roost and foraging sites for these species across regions; and estimate home range sizes for flocks in resident areas, using a combination of GPS and satellite PTT tags.

Tagged birds served as markers of flock movement once integrated into a wild flock of conspecifics, which was confirmed through means of behavioural change point analysis and field observations. Linear mixed models were used to determine differences in movement across regions, revisitation analysis was used to identify key habitat sites, and an auto-corrected Kernel density estimator was used to estimate the home ranges.

Results showed that key roosts sites for the three species predominantly occurred on public green space and private property. These were closely associated with foraging habitat which mainly occurred as remnant vegetation in the landscape or as nature reserves. Riparian zones and roadside vegetation were shown to play a crucial role as foraging habitat and in providing connective landscape structures. Daily movement distances differed both between and within regions depending on habitat matrix, resulting in varying home range sizes. These results suggest that movement for the three black cockatoo species is region specific, driven by food resources in the landscape. In addition, between species, movement varied as each species uses the landscape in different ways, depending on seasonal movements and ecological requirements.

This research has provided critical baseline data required to address knowledge gaps listed in Recovery Plans for these species of black cockatoo. Further research is now required to include these data in resource and habitat selection models to identify how the landscape matrix affects movement, which will facilitate adaptive habitat management and conservation plans for black cockatoos in Western Australia.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Murdoch Affiliation: Environmental and Conservation Sciences
United Nations SDGs: Goal 15: Life on Land
Supervisor(s): Shephard, Jill, Warren, Kristin and Yeap, Lian
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/55805
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year