Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Some costs of reproduction for male bushcrickets, Requena verticalis (Orthoptera : Tettigoniidae) allocating resources to mate attraction and nuptial feeding

Simmons, L.W., Teale, R.J., Maier, M., Standish, R.J., Bailey, W.J. and Withers, P.C. (1992) Some costs of reproduction for male bushcrickets, Requena verticalis (Orthoptera : Tettigoniidae) allocating resources to mate attraction and nuptial feeding. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 31 (1). pp. 57-62.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00167816
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

The cost of reproductive effort is known to result in a trade-off between current and future reproduction. Similarly, trade-offs in energy allocation may occur between components of reproductive effort, mating and parental effort, within a single reproductive episode. We investigated the energy allocated to mating effort (calling to attract females) and parental effort (donation of spermatophore nutrients at mating) by male bushcrickets, Requena verticalis, under two dietary regimes. Males provided with a low quality diet reduced the daily energy allocated to calling activity while maintaining their investment in spermatophores. Males provided with a high quality diet did not allocate more resources per day to their spermatophores but stored excess energy for future reproduction. Thus, on a per day basis, males appear to hold constant their investment in the spermatophore at the cost of reduced mating effort when resources are limited. Males on both diets, however, increased the size of their spermatophore donations when the interval between female encounters was increased. One explanation for this pattern could be a frequency-dependent optimization of spermatophore size.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/55635
Item Control Page Item Control Page