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Traditional sets versus rest-redistribution: A laboratory-controlled study of a specific cluster set configuration at fast and slow velocities

Tufano, J.J., Omcirk, D., Malecek, J., Pisz, A., Halaj, M. and Scott, B.R.ORCID: 0000-0002-2484-4019 (2020) Traditional sets versus rest-redistribution: A laboratory-controlled study of a specific cluster set configuration at fast and slow velocities. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 45 (4). pp. 421-430.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2019-0584
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Abstract

This study investigated redistributing long inter-set rest intervals into shorter but more frequent intervals at 2 different concentric velocities. Resistance-trained men performed 4 randomised isokinetic unilateral knee extension protocols, 2 at 60°·s−1 and 2 at 360°·s−1. At each speed, subjects performed 40 repetitions with 285 s of rest using traditional sets (TS; 4 sets of 10 with 95 s of inter-set rest) and rest-redistribution (RR; 20 sets of 2 with 15 s inter-set rest). Before and at 2, 5, and 10 min after exercise, tensiomyography (TMG) and oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy; NIRS) were measured. NIRS was also measured during exercise, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was recorded after every 10 repetitions. At both speeds, RR displayed greater peak torque, total work, and power output during latter repetitions, but there were no differences between TS or RR when averaging all 40 repetitions. The RPE was less during RR at both speeds (p < 0.05). RR increased select muscle oxygen saturation and blood flow at both speeds. There were no effects of protocol on TMG, but effect sizes favoured a quicker recovery after RR. RR was likely beneficial in maintaining performance compared with the latter parts of TS sets and limiting perceived and peripheral fatigue.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
Murdoch Applied Sports Science Laboratory
Publisher: National Research Council Canada
Copyright: © 2020 – Canadian Science Publishing
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/55505
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