Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Intergenerational differences in the intention to use psychological cybercounseling: A Chinese case study

Teo, T.ORCID: 0000-0002-7552-8497, Shi, W., Huang, F. and Hoi, C.K.W. (2020) Intergenerational differences in the intention to use psychological cybercounseling: A Chinese case study. Patient Education and Counseling, 103 (8). pp. 1615-1622.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2020.02.035
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Objective
This study applied an extended theory of planned behavior (E-TPB) model to investigate factors that contribute to the intention to use psychological cybercounseling in a Chinese sample. The moderating effects of intergenerational differences on relationships of E-TPB variables were also tested.

Methods
A total of 1494 Chinese participants Mage = 18.95 years, SD = 10.19; 49.9 % male) completed a self-report questionnaire measuring seven constructs: intention (INT), attitude (ATT), subjective norms (SN), perceived behavioral control (PBC), attitude toward the Internet (ATI), social stigma of seeking psychological help (SSSPH), and computer self-efficacy (CSE).

Results
Structural equation modeling showed that the E-TPB model accounted for 32.5 % of variance in INT. SN was the strongest determinant of INT, followed by PBC and ATT. Multi-group analysis revealed that intergenerational differences significantly moderated three paths: CSE → PBC, ATT → INT, and SN → INT.

Conclusion
The results demonstrated the efficacy of E-TPB in explaining the intention to use psychological cybercounseling in a Chinese sample. Several factors related to the intention to use psychological cybercounseling were identified in this sample.

Practice Implications
The results can help promote psychological cybercounseling use in this population.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Education
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2020 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/55119
Item Control Page Item Control Page