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Stress to the ultimate degree: Coping with danger on U.S. submarines during the Second World War

Sturma, M. (2020) Stress to the ultimate degree: Coping with danger on U.S. submarines during the Second World War. International Journal of Maritime History, 32 (1). pp. 88-100.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1177/0843871420904529
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Abstract

Despite the extreme stress faced by submariners on patrol during the Second World War, the incidence of mental breakdown appears to have been very low. Contemporary researchers identified a number of factors that contributed to the mental health of crew members, including their selection, training, rest between patrols and confidence in their leaders. Based largely on the reminiscences of submarine veterans, this article argues that men’s attitudes also played a significant role in coping with danger on patrols. Many submariners adopted a fatalistic attitude that allowed them to accept or deny the likelihood of their deaths. At the same time, they often practiced beliefs and rituals in an attempt to balance the odds of survival in their favour.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Global Studies
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Copyright: © 2020 by International Maritime Economic History Association
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/55111
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