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The effect of backpack load position on photographic measures of craniovertebral posture in 150 asymptomatic young adults

Daffin, L., Stuelcken, M.C., Armitage, J. and Sayers, M.G.L. (2020) The effect of backpack load position on photographic measures of craniovertebral posture in 150 asymptomatic young adults. Work, 65 (2). pp. 361-368.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.3233/WOR-203088
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Abstract

BACKGROUND:Altering the horizontal position of the weight in a backpack will influence the magnitude of the external torque it creates but the effect on posture is unclear. OBJECTIVE:To use photogrammetry to determine if changes in the horizontal position of a fixed backpack weight affect external measures of craniovertebral posture in 150 asymptomatic young adults. METHODS:A backpack was attached to a steel frame with a bar protruding posteriorly. A fixed load (5% body mass) was placed at three distances along the bar –0 m, 0.20 m, and 0.40 m. Sagittal and frontal plane photogrammetry was used to measure the craniovertebral angle (CVA), upper cervical gaze angle (UCGA) and lateral head tilt angle (LHTA). A comparison was made across unloaded (no backpack) and loaded conditions. RESULTS:There was a significant decrease in the CVA between unloaded and loaded conditions. Changes in the UCGA were small and, while significant, may not have practical importance. There were no differences in the LHTA between the conditions. CONCLUSIONS:Changes in the horizontal position of a fixed load affect external measures of craniovertebral posture so consideration needs to be given to not only the weight of a backpack but how the weight is positioned within the backpack.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
Publisher: IOS Press
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/55062
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