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Longitudinal analysis of Giardia duodenalis assemblages in animals inhabiting drinking water catchments in New South Wales and Queensland - Australia (2013-2015)

Zahedi, A.ORCID: 0000-0002-0165-3797, Odgers, T., Ball, A., Watkinson, A., Robertson, I.ORCID: 0000-0002-4255-4752 and Ryan, U.ORCID: 0000-0003-2710-9324 (2020) Longitudinal analysis of Giardia duodenalis assemblages in animals inhabiting drinking water catchments in New South Wales and Queensland - Australia (2013-2015). Science of The Total Environment, 718 . Article 137433.

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Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.137433
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Abstract

Giardia duodenalis is one of the most common waterborne zoonotic parasites worldwide, and its occurrence in the environment and catchment reservoir water has serious implications for management of drinking water. The aim of the present study was to use molecular tools to identify the Giardia spp. infecting animals inhabiting five drinking water catchments across two states in Australia; New South Wales and Queensland, to better understand the potential health risks they pose. We used quantitative PCR to screen a total of 2174 faecal samples collected from dominant host species in catchment areas for the presence of G. duodenalis. All samples positive for G. duodenalis were further characterized and subtyped at tpi and gdh loci, respectively. The overall prevalence of G. duodenalis was 15.3% (332/2174, 95%CI; 13.8-16.9), and two zoonotic assemblages (assemblages A and B) and one potentially zoonotic assemblage (E) were detected in various host species. Additional subtyping of a subset of samples (n = 76) identified four human infectious sub-assemblages including AI, AII, BII-like and BIV-like, all of which have been previously reported in humans in Australia. The finding of zoonotic assemblages of G. duodenalis in the present study necessitates continued identification of the sources/carriers of human pathogenic strains in drinking water catchment areas for more accurate risk assessment and optimal catchment management.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2020 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/54977
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