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Tit for tat: Abusive supervision and knowledge hiding - The role of psychological contract breach and psychological ownership

Ghani, U., Teo, T.ORCID: 0000-0002-7552-8497, Li, Y., Usman, M., Islam, Z.U., Gul, H., Naeem, R.M., Bahadar, H., Yuan, J. and Zhai, X. (2020) Tit for tat: Abusive supervision and knowledge hiding - The role of psychological contract breach and psychological ownership. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (4). Article 1240.

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Abstract

The extant literature has focused on individuals' knowledge-sharing behavior and its driving factors, which stimulate the knowledge transmission and exchange in organizations. However, little research has focused on factors that inhibit knowledge sharing and encourage individuals to hide their knowledge. Therefore, based on social exchange and displaced aggression theories, the study proposed and checked a model that examined the effect of abusive supervision on knowledge hiding (KH) via a psychological contract breach (PCB). The Psychological ownership was regarded as a boundary condition on abusive supervision and KH relationship. Using a time-lagged method, we recruited 344 full-time employees enrolled in an executive development program in a large university in China. The findings show that PCB mediates the association between abusive supervision and KH. Similarly, psychological ownership moderates the association between abusive supervision and KH. Employees with high psychological ownership minimized the effect of abusive supervision on KH. Based on study findings, contributions to theory and practice, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Education
Publisher: MDPI
Copyright: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/54967
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