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Electrophoretic deposition of layer-by-layer unsheathed carbon nanotubes - A step towards steerable surface roughness and wettability

Korczeniewski, E., Zięba, M., Zięba, W., Kolanowska, A., Bolibok, P., Kowalczyk, P., Wiertel-Pochopień, A., Zawała, J., Boncel, S. and Terzyk, A.P. (2020) Electrophoretic deposition of layer-by-layer unsheathed carbon nanotubes - A step towards steerable surface roughness and wettability. Materials, 13 (3). Article 595.

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Abstract

It is well known that carbon nanotube (CNT) oxidation (usually with concentrated HNO3) is a major step before the electrophoretic deposition (EPD). However, the recent discovery of the “onion effect” proves that multiwalled carbon nanotubes are not only oxidized, but a simultaneous unsheathing process occurs. We present the first report concerning the influence of unsheathing on the properties of the thus-formed CNT surface layer. In our study we examine how the process of gradual oxidation/unsheathing of a series of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) influences the morphology of the surface formed via EPD. Taking a series of well-characterized and gradually oxidized/unsheathing Nanocyl™ MWCNTs and performing EPD on a carbon fiber surface, we analyzed the morphology and wettability of the CNT surfaces. Our results show that the water contact angle could be gradually changed in a wide range (125–163°) and the major property determining its value was the diameter of aggregates formed before the deposition process in the solvent. Based on the obtained results we determined the parameters having a crucial influence on the morphology of created layers. Our results shed new light on the deposition mechanism and enable the preparation of surfaces with steerable roughness and wettability.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education
Publisher: MDPI
Copyright: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/54964
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