Catalog Home Page

Intra- and inter-laboratory agreement of the disc diffusion assay for assessing antimicrobial susceptibility of porcine Escherichia coli

Badger, S., Abraham, S., Stryhn, H., Trott, D.J., Jordan, D. and Caraguel, C.G.B. (2019) Intra- and inter-laboratory agreement of the disc diffusion assay for assessing antimicrobial susceptibility of porcine Escherichia coli. Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 172 .

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2019.104782
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Reliable assessment of the susceptibility of animal bacterial pathogens to antimicrobials is of paramount importance in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. This work aims to estimate the repeatability (intra-laboratory agreement) and reproducibility (inter-laboratory agreement) of the disc diffusion assay in veterinary laboratories to understand further if the assay has a role in the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in animals. Seven major veterinary laboratories from all States in Australia participated, and each tested the same panel of isolates five times at three to four-week intervals, against six antimicrobial agents using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute protocols. The panel consisted of twenty different isolates from porcine Escherichia coli from clinical cases and a single reference strain (ATCC 25922). Laboratories were blinded to the identity of the isolates, replicates, and to each other. In total, 4200 inhibition zone diameters (mm) were collected, and analysed descriptively, graphically, and with linear mixed models. Regardless of the laboratories and isolate/antimicrobial combinations, the overall very major error rate (proportion of isolates classified as susceptible when actual status is resistant) was 1.6%; the major error rate (proportion of isolates classified as resistant when actual status is susceptible) was 1.6%; and the ‘minor error’ rate (proportion of isolates with intermediate susceptibility that measure fully susceptible or resistant or vice versa) was 2.4%. The variation between repeated measurements ranged between 4.4–7.2 mm depending on the antimicrobial agent assessed. The reproducibility was always more variable than the repeatability, which suggested some laboratory effects. The repeatability coefficient of disc diffusion was lowest for tetracycline (4.4 mm, 95% CI: 3.8–5.0 mm) and ampicillin (4.6 mm, 95% CI: 4.2–5.2 mm) and highest for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (6.6 mm, 95% CI: 5.9–7.4 mm). The reproducibility coefficient of disc diffusion was lowest for gentamicin (5.4, 95% CI: 4.0–7.2) and highest for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (7.2 mm, 95%CI: 4.5–11.7 mm). The precision of the disc diffusion assay was deemed satisfactory for use in a national surveillance program for clinical porcine E. coli isolates. However, measurement variation of the disc diffusion assay is of concern for isolates with marginal susceptibility or resistance due to increased risk of misclassification.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infectious Disease Laboratory
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2019 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/53643
Item Control Page Item Control Page