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Born in the USA—Importing American fears of random crime

Schwartz, M.D. and Israel, M.ORCID: 0000-0002-1263-8699 (2000) Born in the USA—Importing American fears of random crime. Current Issues in Criminal Justice, 11 (3). pp. 337-342.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/10345329.2000.12036169
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Abstract

Criminologists generally accept that ideologies of crime control are constructed (and packaged) for both domestic and export markets (Cohen 1972; Israel1997). Americans, of course, have played a key part in this trade. However, the export of American fears of crime has been a less recognized phenomenon. In this short paper, we argue that contemporary American culture has a tendency to stimulate panics about lesser matters. In following the American lead, not only are Australians scared about problems that may not exist in Australia, but many are scared about problems that barely exist in America. Countries with lesser crime problems, such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom watch American television shows, read American books, see American politicians, and seem all too frequently to develop an American desire to panic about crime

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Sydney Institute of Criminology
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/53483
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