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Maximal oxygen uptake in estonian young cross-country skiers: a longitudinal study

Magi, A., Kõks, S. and Unt, E. (2015) Maximal oxygen uptake in estonian young cross-country skiers: a longitudinal study. Sănătate Publică, Economie şi Management în Medicină, 64 (7).

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Abstract

Longitudinal studies have shown that VO2max increases the most as the outcome of training in the age between 15-25 (Rusko, 2003). Meanwhile, it is not clear how much this increase is connected to training or other development values. The aim of the present study was to analyze maximal oxygen uptake longitudinally among 15-19 year old cross-country skiers and its relations with training characteristics. Methods: determination of anthropometrical data (height, weight, BMI) and aerobic capacity (VO2max) in the age period from 15 to 19 years during 5 years in 58 skiers (41 males and 17 females). Results: The dynamics of relative VO2peak (ml / kg / min) were not signifi cant in comparison across all age groups in young male skiers. A signifi cant positive trend of VO2peak (l / min; ml / kg / min) was found in young female skiers in the 17-year-old age group compared with the previous age group. Signifi cant relationship was detected between change of training volume and change of VO2peak / kg (difference between the age of 15 and 19 years among male young skiers) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). In conclusion, our study showed a moderate increase in VO2peak during the age period of 15 to 19 years, whereas the increase was more pronounced in male than female skiers. VO2peak of young cross-country skiers was associated with the age as well as with the training hours per week.

Long-term studies have shown that, as a result of training, the greatest increase in VO2max is observed in age groups from 15 to 25 years (Rusko, 2003). However, it is not clear to what extent this increase is associated with the training process or other development indicators. The purpose of the studies was a long-term analysis of the maximum oxygen consumption in age groups from 15 to 19 years and their relationship with training characteristics. Methodology: measurement of anthropometric data (weight, height, BMI) and determination of aerobic performance (VO2max) for 5 years in different age groups from 15 to 19 years spent among a group of 58 skiers (41 men and 17 women). In the annual observation over the dynamics of VO2 peak (l / min; ml / kg / min), there was no significant discrepancy between the data among all age groups of young male skiers. A significant positive trend in VO2 peak (l / min; ml / kg / min) was found among young female skiers aged 17 years compared with the previous age group. The most significant correlation between changes in the volume of training and VO2 peak / kg was revealed in the age groups of 15 and 19 years among young male skiers (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). Our studies showed a moderate increase in VO2 peaks between the ages of 15 and 19, and at the same time, the increase was more pronounced in male skiers than in female skiers. VO2 peak in young skiers depends on both age and the number of training hours per week.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Instrument Bibliometric National
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/53300
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