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Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in domestic cats in Western Australia: Prevalence of natural infection and association with clinical and morphological disease

Thomas, Jan (1997) Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in domestic cats in Western Australia: Prevalence of natural infection and association with clinical and morphological disease. PhD thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

A series of studies was undertaken to survey the prevalence of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) infection in domestic cats in Western Australia and to establish the relationship between infection and states of clinical and morphological disease.

The studies established that there was a high prevalence of FIV infection in sick cats in Western Australia. The historical data, clinical and clinicopathological changes affecting these animals were compared with those from sick cats unaffected by FIV. This revealed the typical disease picture seen with FIV infection in cats from Western Australia. Anaemia, lymphopaenia, azotaemia, and hyperglobulinaemia were associated with FIV infection. Similarly male cats and cats over 4 years of age were more likely to be affected by FIV infection. Clinical signs were limited to systemic signs of anorexia, weight loss, collapse, and hypothermia. Previously reported clinical signs were not confirmed when the prevalence of these signs were examined in conjunction with the prevalence in the FIV negative sick cats.

The impact of FIV infection on anaemia in cats was further investigated. This incorporated examination for other reported causal agents and mechanisms that induce anaemia. Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) infection was found to be the most significant infectious agent in anaemic cats. An aetiology or mechanism was identified in more than 85% of cats.

Similarly, the significance of FIV infection in feline renal disease in cats was determined. The histological patterns and frequency of renal disease in cats in Western Australia was established using archival material. Prospective analysis of azotaemic cats established the clinicopathologic and clinical changes seen in each pattern of renal disease. FIV showed a trend toward association with the combined patterns of reflux nephropathy and pyelonephritis. Previously unrecognised patterns of renal disease were described.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary Studies
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you.
Supervisor(s): Robinson, Wayne and Huxtable, Clive
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/53185
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