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Promoter polymorphism at position –592 of the interleukin-10 is not associated with early and late-onset psoriasis

Kingo, K., Kõks, S., Karelson, M., Silm, H. and Vasar, E. (2002) Promoter polymorphism at position –592 of the interleukin-10 is not associated with early and late-onset psoriasis. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 16 (s1). p. 291.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1468-3083.16.s1.1.x
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Abstract

IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine that is involved in many aspects of the immune response and is dysregulated in human autoimmune disease. The IL-10 gene is highly polymorphic and certain haplotypes result in differential IL-10 expression. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is associated with relative under expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The aim of our study was to observe association of single nucleotide polymorphism in the IL-10 gene at position –592 (C to A, SNP ID rs1800872) with psoriasis. We searched for associations between the different forms of psoriasis (early and late-onset psoriasis) and IL-10 gene polymorphism at position –592 depending on the sex of patients and the family history of psoriasis. One-hundred 82 patients with psoriasis and 77 control subjects were included in this study. To detect the nucleotides at position –592 (C or A), we applied ARMS (Amplification Refractory Mutation System)-PCR. The A/ C genotype was found in 81 patients with psoriasis (44.5%) compared with 36 (46.8%) of the controls, the C/C genotype was found in 101 patients with psoriasis (55.5%) compared with 41 (53.2%) of the controls. We did not find any patient with A/A genotype. According to the literature the frequency of A/A genotype is very low. The background for that peculiar finding needs further studies, but dysfunctional immune response in A/A patients might be the cause. We also found no statistically significant differences between the allelic frequencies in patients with early onset psoriasis (A/C 43.5%, C/ C 56.5%) and late-onset psoriasis (A/C 47.1%, C/C 52.9%) compared to healthy individuals. Genotype of psoriasis patients was not dependent neither from the sex nor family history of psoriasis. Our results show that genetic polymorphism at position –592 of the IL-10 promoter is probably not associated with psoriasis.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Wiley
Copyright: 2002 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
Other Information: Poster abstract: 11th Congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology. 2-6 October 2002, Prague, Czech Republic
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/52976
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