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Combined haplotype analysis of the interleukin-19 and -20 genes: Relationship to plaque-type psoriasis

Kõks, S., Kingo, K., Rätsep, R., Karelson, M., Silm, H. and Vasar, E. (2004) Combined haplotype analysis of the interleukin-19 and -20 genes: Relationship to plaque-type psoriasis. Genes & Immunity, 5 (8). pp. 662-667.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.gene.6364141
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Abstract

There is increasing evidence to suggest that the newly discovered cytokines interleukin (IL)-19 and -20 have a role in the function of epidermis and in psoriasis. The genes encoding these cytokines locate into the genomic IL-10 region on human chromosome 1. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes have an impact on the susceptibility for psoriasis. From pairwise linkage disequilibrium (LD) matrix of the IL-19 and -20 gene polymorphisms, what reflects the nonrandom association of alleles at these markers, it was apparent that IL-19 and -20 genes form one block of LD. We found that the HT3 CACCGGAA haplotype of the IL-19 and -20 genes was associated with an increased risk of psoriasis, reflecting its role in determining susceptibility to plaque-type psoriasis. Although association analysis of the IL-19 gene indicated that minor alleles of the IL-19 gene SNPs (rs2243188, rs2243169 and rs2243158) revealed protective effect to psoriasis and haplotype analysis of the IL-19 gene proved significant protective effect of the TGATA haplotype in case of late-onset disease, combined haplotype analysis of the IL-19 and -20 genes demonstrated that protective effect of the IL-19 gene is secondary to the susceptibility effect of the IL-20 gene.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Springer Nature
Copyright: © 2019 Springer Nature Limited
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/52901
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