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Differences in behavioural effects of amphetamine and dopamine-related gene expression in wild-type and homozygous CCK2 receptor deficient mice

Rünkorg, K., Värv, S., Matsui, T., Kõks, S. and Vasar, E. (2006) Differences in behavioural effects of amphetamine and dopamine-related gene expression in wild-type and homozygous CCK2 receptor deficient mice. Neuroscience Letters, 406 (1-2). pp. 17-22.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2006.07.016
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Abstract

Neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) interacts with dopamine in the regulation of motor activity and motivations. Therefore, in CCK2 receptor deficient mice the behavioural effects of repeated amphetamine administration and changes in dopamine-related gene expression were studied. Four-day amphetamine (1 mg/kg) treatment induced a significantly stronger motor sensitization in homozygous mice compared to their wild-type littermates. However, in the conditioned place preference test the action of amphetamine was more pronounced in wild-type animals. As opposed to wild-type mice, amphetamine (1–3 mg/kg) did not cause a significant conditioned place preference in homozygous mice. The expression of Tyhy gene was elevated in the mesolimbic structures and Drd2 gene was down-regulated in the mesencephalon of saline-treated homozygous mice in comparison with respective wild-type group. Four-day treatment with amphetamine induced a significant increase in the expression of Tyhy in the mesencephalon, striatum and mesolimbic structures of wild-type mice, whereas in homozygous mice a similar change was evident only in the mesencephalon. Also, the expression of Drd1 gene in the striatum and Drd2 gene in the mesolimbic structures of wild-type mice were up-regulated under the influence of amphetamine. In conclusion, the present study established differences in the behavioural effects of amphetamine in wild-type and homozygous mice. The increased tone of dopaminergic projections from the mesencephalon to mesolimbic structures is probably related to increased amphetamine-induced motor sensitization in homozygous mice. The lack of development of up-regulation of Drd1 and Drd2 genes after repeated treatment with amphetamine probably explains the reduced place conditioning in CCK2 receptor deficient mice.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/52850
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