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Distribution of Wfs1 protein in the central nervous system of the mouse and its relation to clinical symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome

Luuk, H., Kõks, S., Plaas, M., Hannibal, J., Rehfeld, J.F. and Vasar, E. (2008) Distribution of Wfs1 protein in the central nervous system of the mouse and its relation to clinical symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome. The Journal of Comparative Neurology, 509 (6). pp. 642-660.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.21777
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Abstract

Mutations in the coding region of the WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, a rare multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. Patients with Wolfram syndrome display considerable clinical pleiomorphism, and symptoms such as neurological complications and psychiatric disorders are common. In the present study we have characterized Wfs1 expression pattern in the mouse central nervous system by using a combination of immunohistochemistry on wild‐type mice and X‐Gal staining of Wfs1 knockout mice with targeted insertion of the lacZ reporter. We identified a robust enrichment of Wfs1 protein in the central extended amygdala and ventral striatum. Prominent Wfs1 expression was seen in the hippocampal CA1 region, parasubiculum, superficial part of the second and third layers of the prefrontal cortex and proisocortical areas, hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory system, and central auditory pathway. Wfs1 expression was also detected in numerous brainstem nuclei and in laminae VIII and IX of the spinal cord. Wfs1‐positive nerve fibers were found in the medial forebrain bundle, reticular part of the substantia nigra, globus pallidus, posterior caudate putamen, lateral lemniscus, alveus, fimbria, dorsal hippocampal commissure, subiculum, and to a lesser extent in the central sublenticular extended amygdala, compact part of substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental area. The neuroanatomical findings suggest that the lack of Wfs1 protein function can be related to several neurological and psychiatric symptoms found in Wolfram syndrome. Enrichment of Wfs1 protein in the central extended amygdala suggests a role in the modulation of anxiety and fear.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
Copyright: © 2008 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/52765
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