Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Selected antecedents of customer orientation of bank employees: An Indonesian perspective

Sri Gunawan, (1998) Selected antecedents of customer orientation of bank employees: An Indonesian perspective. Professional Doctorate thesis, Murdoch University.

[img]
PDF - Whole Thesis
Available Upon Request

Abstract

It is critical to the success of service delivery that employees are adequately oriented to their customers (Hartline and Ferrell, 1996). Because of the importance of the service encounter, organizations must find ways of managing their customer-contact employees to ensure that their attitudes and behaviors are conducive to the type of service delivery which leads to customer satisfaction.

The objective of this study was to test the selected antecedents of customer orientation of employees. This study also tests the generalizability of models and empirical findings developed using Western data in a different non-western setting. The setting of the present study was the customer-contact employees of banks in East Java, Indonesia. Therefore the study replicated and extended previous studies on customer orientation by incorporating and investigating the effects of empowerment and self-monitoring on the customer orientation of employees (e.g. Hartline and Ferrel, 1996; Menguc, 1996; Siguaw, Brown and Widing, 1994).

The proposed antecedents tested, as suggested by prior studies, included the market orientation of the firm, the customer orientation of manager, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, empowerment, role conflict, role ambiguity and self-monitoring.

Survey questionnaires were used to collect data from customer-contact employees of branches and sub-branches of four national banks in three cities of East Java, Indonesia (299 usable questionnaires). The sixteen hypothesized variable relationships were then tested using an AMOS version 3.6 structural equation model.

The statistical analysis revealed eleven (hypothesized) significant relationships among the constructs in the final model. Also, four other relationships were revealed as a result of the modification of the original model. The market orientation of the firm was significantly related to the customer orientation of the manager, but was not related to the customer orientation of the employee. The customer orientation of the manager was significantly related to the customer orientation of the employee and was also related to empowerment. The use of empowerment by the manager was found to be related to the customer orientation of the employee.

Other findings of the study were that role conflict was found to negatively influence organizational commitment, role ambiguity and customer orientation of employee, but the findings failed to support the hypothesis of a negative relationship between role conflict and job satisfaction. Role ambiguity was also found to be negatively related to job satisfaction, but was not related to organizational commitment and customer orientation of the employee. The job satisfaction of the employee was found to influence the organizational commitment of the employee and the customer orientation of customer-contact employees; however, contrary to expectations, organizational commitment was not related to the customer orientation of the employee. Finally, self-monitoring was found to positively influence the level of customer orientation of employee.

The four non hypothesized relationships added in the model were also significant. Firstly self-monitoring was negatively related to role ambiguity. Another significant relationship revealed was between role ambiguity and empowerment. Thirdly, the customer orientation of the manager was positively related to the job satisfaction of the employee. Finally, the market orientation of the firm was also found negatively related to role ambiguity.

The practical implications of the findings were discussed including the specific actions that managers can take to encourage their employees to become more customer-oriented during a service encounter.

Item Type: Thesis (Professional Doctorate)
Murdoch Affiliation: Division of Business, Information Technology and Law
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you.
Supervisor(s): Winzar, Hume
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/52676
Item Control Page Item Control Page