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Caudal glands and their secretions in the Western Spiny-Tailed Gecko, Diplodactylus spinigerus

Richardson, K.C. and Hinchliffe, P.M. (1983) Caudal glands and their secretions in the Western Spiny-Tailed Gecko, Diplodactylus spinigerus. Copeia, 1983 (1). p. 161.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.2307/1444710
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Abstract

The intact tails of western spiny-tailed geckos, Diplodactylus spinigerus, contain segmental caudal glands, the contents of which may be expelled and squirted up to 50 cm. The secretion is usually dominated by pycnotic nuclei and cellular remnants. Occasionally it consists of large polygonal cells that exhibit polychromasia due to their cytoplasmic organelles. Up to two-thirds of the cytoplasm is filled with tightly packed concentric lamellae, the remainder has numerous vacuoles adjacent to the nucleus. Some of these vacuoles are retained within the lamellae, others have a single lamellar strand contiguous with their outer surface; most lie free. Neither mitochondria nor Golgi apparatus are apparent. Geckos discouraged the attack of predators by elevating their tail and expelling their secretion directly at the predator. When a rat seized a gecko the secretion usually caused the rat immediately to drop the gecko. Presistent attacks caused the geckos to autotomize their tails. Rats would eat these tails without observable ill-effects.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary Studies
Publisher: American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
Copyright: © 1983 American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH)
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/52667
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