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Relation between increased anxiety and reduced expression of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of GABAA receptors in Wfs1-deficient mice

Raud, S., Sütt, S., Luuk, H., Plaas, M., Innos, J., Kõks, S. and Vasar, E. (2009) Relation between increased anxiety and reduced expression of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of GABAA receptors in Wfs1-deficient mice. Neuroscience Letters, 460 (2). pp. 138-142.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2009.05.054
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Abstract

Mutations in the coding region of the WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, a rare multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. In clinical studies a relation between mutations in the Wfs1 gene and increased susceptibility for mood disorders has been established. According to our previous studies, mice lacking Wfs1 gene displayed increased anxiety in stressful environment. As the GABA-ergic system plays a significant role in the regulation of anxiety, we analyzed the expression of GABA-related genes in the forebrain structures of wild-type and Wfs1-deficient mice. Experimentally naïve Wfs1-deficient animals displayed a significant down-regulation of α1 (Gabra1) and α2 (Gabra2) subunits of GABAA receptors in the temporal lobe and frontal cortex. Exposure of wild-type mice to the elevated plus-maze decreased levels of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the temporal lobe. A similar tendency was also established in the frontal cortex of wild-type animals exposed to behavioral test. In Wfs1-deficient mice the elevated plus-maze exposure did not induce further changes in the expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes. By contrast, the expression of Gad1 and Gad2 genes, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of GABA, was not significantly affected by the exposure of mice to the elevated plus-maze or by the invalidation of Wfs1 gene. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that increased anxiety of Wfs1-deficient mice is probably linked to reduced expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the frontal cortex and temporal lobe.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/52003
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