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Myg1-deficient mice display alterations in stress-induced responses and reduction of sex-dependent behavioural differences

Philips, M-A, Abramov, U., Lilleväli, K., Luuk, H., Kurrikoff, K., Raud, S., Plaas, M., Innos, J., Puussaar, T. and Kõks, S. (2010) Myg1-deficient mice display alterations in stress-induced responses and reduction of sex-dependent behavioural differences. Behavioural Brain Research, 207 (1). pp. 182-195.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2009.10.005
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Abstract

Myg1 (Melanocyte proliferating gene 1) is a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed gene, which encodes a protein with mitochondrial and nuclear localization. In the current study we demonstrate a gradual decline of Myg1 expression during the postnatal development of the mouse brain that suggests relevance for Myg1 in developmental processes. To study the effects of Myg1 loss-of-function, we created Myg1-deficient (−/−) mice by displacing the entire coding sequence of the gene. Initial phenotyping, covering a multitude of behavioural, cognitive, neurological, physiological and stress-related responses, revealed that homozygous Myg1 (−/−) mice are vital, fertile and display no gross abnormalities. Myg1 (−/−) mice showed an inconsistent pattern of altered anxiety-like behaviour in different tests. The plus-maze and social interaction tests revealed that male Myg1 (−/−) mice were significantly less anxious than their wild-type littermates; female (−/−) mice showed increased anxiety in the locomotor activity arena. Restraint-stress significantly reduced the expression of the Myg1 gene in the prefrontal cortex of female wild-type mice and restrained female (−/−) mice showed a blunted corticosterone response, suggesting involvement of Myg1 in stress-induced responses. The main finding of the present study was that Myg1 invalidation decreases several behavioural differences between male and female animals that were obvious in wild-type mice, indicating that Myg1 contributes to the expression of sex-dependent behavioural differences in mice. Taken together, we provide evidence for the involvement of Myg1 in anxiety- and stress-related responses and suggest that Myg1 contributes to the expression of sex-dependent behavioural differences.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Copyright: © 2009 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/51933
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