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Contraception in dogs using a slow release implant containing the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist deslorelin

Junaidi, Aris (1998) Contraception in dogs using a slow release implant containing the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist deslorelin. PhD thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

The aim in the present study was to evaluate the impact of treatment with a slow release implant containing the GnRH agonist deslorelin on the pituitary gonadal axis and on sperm production in adult male dogs. The reason for the study was to explore the potential of these implants to achieve long term, reversible contraception in dogs.

Three dose rates of deslorelin, 3mg, 6mg and 12mg were used in the implants in the study.

The effect of the implants on pituitary and testicular function was monitored by measuring plasma LH and testosterone concentrations, testicular volume and semen characteristics. The degree of desensitization of the pituitary gonadotrophs and Leydig cells during treatment with deslorelin was measured by challenging the dogs with injections of GnRH and bovine LH at 0, 15, 25, 40, and 100 days after implantation, and measuring the plasma LH and testosterone responses to challenge.

The effect of the deslorelin implants on the reproductive physiology of the dogs was characterized by a reduction in plasma LH and testosterone concentrations to undetectable levels within 3 weeks of implantation. Histological findings showed atrophic changes in seminiferous tubules, ductus epididymides and prostate gland after 25 days of treatment, the atrophy becoming progressively more severe on day 40 and 100 after implantation. Only spermatogonia and Sertoli cells were present in seminiferous tubules after 100 days.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary Studies
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you.
Supervisor(s): Williamson, Peter, Cummins, Jim and Martin, Graeme
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/51710
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