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A systems-based method for strategic industry-level analysis applied to the textile industries in Taiwan, Korea, Indonesia and Vietnam: An Australian perspective

Nash, Allen B. (1995) A systems-based method for strategic industry-level analysis applied to the textile industries in Taiwan, Korea, Indonesia and Vietnam: An Australian perspective. PhD thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

Both private-sector strategic planners and public-sector industry policy analysts have the need for a systematic approach to industry-level analysis to provide a basis for strategic and policy interventions in industry. Currently a systematic attempt at industry-level analysis requires the simultaneous use of a plethora of techniques such as Porter's five forces for competitive analysis, value chain analysis for cost structure and other aspects of competitive analysis, network approaches to examine inter-organisational transactions, as well as population ecology to examine population dynamics. Building scenarios of possible consequences of significant strategic moves involves modelling the industry or strategic group through a mix of techniques that do not necessarily synergise to form a consistent basis for modelling. This thesis develops a general-systems-based method for industry-level strategic and policy analysis. The theoretical framework adopted is primarily from general systems theory and strategic policy analysis, with some reference to system dynamics, and industry and technology policy. The aim of the approach is to allow a comprehensive qualitative model of the industry or strategic group to be developed based on representing three subsystems: the social subsystem, the information subsystem, and the technical subsystem. The theory developed is then applied to the textile industry through detailed comparisons of the industry in four different countries to test and refine the method. The perspective provided is primarily for an Australian business policy audience. The conclusions of this study highlight how the method succeeds in providing an improved approach to strategic industry analysis by identifying a comprehensive set of significant factors all of which any one present method would not have recognised.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Economics and Commerce
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you.
Supervisor(s): UNSPECIFIED
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/51202
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