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Multiple introductions of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST612 into Western Australia associated with both human and equine reservoirs

Murphy, R.J.T., Ramsay, J.P., Lee, Y.T., Pang, S., O'Dea, M.A.ORCID: 0000-0002-2757-7585, Pearson, J.C., Axon, J.E., Raby, E., Abdulgader, S.M., Whitelaw, A. and Coombs, G.W.ORCID: 0000-0003-1635-6506 (2019) Multiple introductions of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST612 into Western Australia associated with both human and equine reservoirs. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 54 (6). pp. 681-685.

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Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2019.08.022
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Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human and animal pathogen. Multilocus sequence type 612 (ST612) is the dominant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clone in certain South African hospitals and is sporadically isolated from horses and horse-associated veterinarians in Australia. Colonization and infection by ST612-MRSA is increasing in Western Australia. Whole-genome sequencing was performed for 51 ST612-MRSA isolated from Western Australian patients and healthcare workers, South African hospital patients, Australian veterinarians and New South Wales horses. Core-genome phylogenies suggested Australian equine and veterinarian-associated ST612 were monophyletic. Individual Western Australian isolates grouped either with this equine-associated lineage or more diverse lineages related to those in South African hospitals. Bioinformatic analyses of the complete ST612-MRSA reference genome SVH7513 confirmed ST612-MRSA was closely related to ST8 USA500 MRSA. Common use of rifampicin in South Africa and equine veterinarian practice may favor ST612-MRSA in these settings. ST612-MRSA-colonized humans and horses are potential reservoirs for MRSA in Australia.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infectious Disease Laboratory
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2019 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/50824
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