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The effect of enculturation on the phenomenological concept of depression

Chiranakorn, Parinda (1994) The effect of enculturation on the phenomenological concept of depression. Professional Doctorate thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

The majority of cross-cultural research in depression provides 'snap-shot' depictions of various cultures. This research is interested in the relationship of changes in cultures to changes in the concepts of depression and the self. That is, rather than depicting states, the intent is focused on the process of enculturation and its effect on Marsella's (1980) epistemological model.

This study investigates the effect of enculturation on the cross-cultural variations in the phenomenological concept of depression, using word-associations. The populations sampled are non-clinical populations of Australian-born Chinese, Australian-born Caucasians, and mainland Chinese. Word associations to six non-clinical psychological states and spontaneous self-concept were also investigated.

The results indicated that the Australian-born Caucasians and the mainland Chinese responded primarily using internal mood referents, followed by external referents to the physical environment, to the stimulus word "depression"; the Australian-born Chinese responded with an equal proportion of internal mood referents and external referents to the physical environment. The mainland Chinese responded to the stimulus words "conformity" and "dominance" primarily using internal mood referents, followed by external referents to the social environment, while the Australian-born Chinese and the Australian-born Caucasians responded primarily using external referents to the social environment, followed by internal mood referents. All three groups responded similarly to the stimulus words "shrewdness", "emotional stability", "insecurity", and "boldness" primarily using internal mood referents. The spontaneous self-concept across the three groups showed no differences as all groups responded primarily using personal attributes, followed by social identity descriptors.

Overall, there were more similarities than differences across the three groups. The process variables are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Professional Doctorate)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Social Sciences
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you.
Supervisor(s): Main, Alex
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/50461
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