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Coping and lifestyle as moderators of personality and health: A cross-national study comparing Jordanians and Australians

Odeh, Maysoun Hasan (2000) Coping and lifestyle as moderators of personality and health: A cross-national study comparing Jordanians and Australians. PhD thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

The relationship between personality traits, coping style, lifestyle and health outcome was investigated in four studies in two nations: Jordan and Australia. Study oneincluded an Australian student sample, study two included a Jordanian student sample, study three included an Australian community sample, and study four included Jordanian community sample. Measures included the NEO-FFI, COPE Inventory, the Health Practice Index (HPI), and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). The hypotheses were (1) personality predicts health outcome (2) personality traits predict coping style (3) personality traits predict lifestyle (4) the combination of personality traits, coping style, and lifestyle mediate the relationship between personality and health outcome (5) and that both coping and lifestyle mediate the relationship between personality traits and health outcome. Results indicated that three personality traits predicted health outcome. These were neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness.For the GHQ-28, only one factor (anxiety and insomnia) accounted for health across all four studies. Height and weight accounted for life style only in the Australian sample. Both cigarette consumption and active sports accounted for lifestyle in the Jordanian samples and in the Australian community sample. Sleep accounted for lifestyle in both the Australian samples and in the Jordanian community sample, meals only accounted for lifestyle only in the Australian student sample.

Several different coping styles accounted for the COPE Inventory in the four different samples, in complex arrangements.

Regression analysis indicated that personality traits of openness and agreeableness were not predictive of health outcome. Neuroticism was a common predictor of health outcome across all four studies. However, extraversion predicted health outcome only in the Australian student sample and conscientiousness predicted health outcome only in the Jordanian student sample.

When all personality traits, coping and lifestyle were regressed onto the dependent variable health, neuroticism was the strongest predictor, which predicted health outcome in all four samples. Conscientiousness predicted health outcome only in the Jordanian student sample, and extraversion predicted health outcome only among the Australian student sample. Only Lifestyle Sleep and Coping Behavioral disengagement predicted health outcome in the Australian student sample. No other coping or lifestyle factors were predictive of health outcome in the other three samples which might indicate that coping and lifestyle do not mediate the relationship between personality and health. Cross-national differences with regards to coping and lifestyle are also discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you.
Supervisor(s): Innes, Mike
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/50423
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