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A two-phase approach to elicit and measure beliefs on management strategies: Fishers supportive and aware of trade-offs associated with stock enhancement

Obregón, C., Hughes, M.ORCID: 0000-0002-9810-1891, Loneragan, N.R., Poulton, S.J. and Tweedley, J.R.ORCID: 0000-0002-2749-1060 (2019) A two-phase approach to elicit and measure beliefs on management strategies: Fishers supportive and aware of trade-offs associated with stock enhancement. Ambio . In Press.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-019-01212-y
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Abstract

Understanding fisher beliefs and attitudes towards specific management strategies can help inform and improve fisheries management, and thus stock sustainability. Previous studies highlight a lack of fisher awareness regarding environmental issues influencing the systems they utilise and the negative impacts of specific strategies, such as stock enhancement. Our study used a two-phase approach to first elicit and then measure the strength of common fishers’ beliefs and associated attitudes regarding stock enhancement. Specifically, this research focused on recreational fishers of an estuarine crab fishery (Portunus armatus) in south-western Australia. The results demonstrate that recreational fishers believe stock enhancement could have strong positive outcomes, but also recognise that this management strategy could lead to some negative outcomes, though the latter are perceived as less likely to happen. This contrasts with previous research on fisheries stocking and demonstrates the value of using the two-phase approach to clarify fishers’ perceptions of particular management approaches. To reduce fisher dissatisfaction with management actions, careful communication on the benefits and costs of stock enhancement is recommended. Our study highlights the significance of integrating social sciences into fisheries research, and the need to better understand fishing community beliefs to ensure effective management of the fishery.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Environmental and Conservation Sciences
Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Copyright: © 2019 Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/50165
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