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Charge transport in an organic light emitting diode material measured using metal-insulator-semiconductor charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage with parameter variation

Gao, M., Burn, P.L. and Pivrikas, A. (2019) Charge transport in an organic light emitting diode material measured using metal-insulator-semiconductor charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage with parameter variation. Journal of Applied Physics, 126 (3).

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5100313
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Abstract

We investigated whether perceptually-regulated high-intensity intervals in hypoxia are associated with slower running velocities versus normoxia, when physiological responses and exercise-related sensations remain the same. Nineteen trained runners (33.4 ± 9.1 years) completed a high-intensity interval running protocol (4 × 4-min intervals at a clamped perceived rating exertion of 16 on the 6–20 Borg scale, 3-min passive recoveries) in either hypoxic (HYP; FiO2 15.0%) or normoxic (NOR; FiO2 20.9%) conditions. Participants adjusted to a progressively slower running velocity from interval 1–4 (−7.0%), and more so in HYP vs. NOR for intervals 2, 3 and 4 (−4.6%, −6.4% and − 7.9%, respectively; p < .01). Heart rate increased from interval 1–4 (+4.8%; p < .01), independent of condition. Arterial oxygen saturation was lower in HYP vs. NOR (86.0% vs. 94.8%; p < .01). Oxyhemoglobin (−23.7%) and total hemoglobin (−77.0%) decreased, whilst deoxyhemoglobin increased (+44.9%) from interval 1–4 (p < .01), independent of condition. Perceived recovery (−41.6%) and motivation (−21.8%) were progressively lower from interval 1–4, and more so in HYP vs. NOR for intervals 2, 3 and 4 (recovery: −8.8%, −24.2% and − 29.3%; motivation: −5.3%, −20.3% and − 22.4%, respectively; p < .01). Perceived breathlessness (+18.6%), limb discomfort (+44.0%) and pleasure (−32.2%) changed from interval 1–4, with significant differences (+21.8%, +11.3% and − 31.3%, respectively) between HYP and NOR (p < .01). Slower interval running velocities in hypoxia achieve similar heart rate and muscle oxygenation responses to those observed in normoxia when perceptually-regulated, yet at the expense of less favourable exercise-related sensations.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Murdoch Applied Sports Science Laboratory
Publisher: American Institute of Physics
Copyright: © 2019 Elsevier Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/49959
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