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Trichomonas vaginalis infection in southern Ghana: Clinical signs associated with the infection

Squire, D.S., Lymbery, A.J.ORCID: 0000-0002-0542-3446, Walters, J., Ahmed, H., Asmah, R.H. and Thompson, R.C.A. (2019) Trichomonas vaginalis infection in southern Ghana: Clinical signs associated with the infection. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 113 (7). pp. 359-369.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/trz019
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Abstract

Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent for the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted infection (STI) among women of child-bearing age. In Ghana, although the infection is prevalent, there is a dearth of data on the risk factors and symptoms associated with T. vaginalis infection. This study was conducted on 492 women visiting gynaecological and STI clinics in the Volta Region (VR) and Greater Accra Region (GAR) in southern Ghana. Wet mount microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to diagnose T. vaginalis infection. Infection prevalence was 13.2% and 18.1% by WMM and PCR, respectively. Diagnosis by PCR was significantly more sensitive (McNemar’s test, p=0.0003). The regional prevalence of T. vaginalis infection by PCR was 21.7% in the VR and 12.8% in the GAR. There was a significant difference in prevalence between the two regions (Fisher’s exact test, p=0.02). T. vaginalis infection was associated with vaginal itch (odds ratio [OR]=1.71, p=0.04) and a history of engaging in oral sex (OR 1.90, p=0.04). A high prevalence of T. vaginalis infection was recorded among women visiting gynaecological and STI clinics in southern Ghana. There was no consistent association of infection with any recorded clinical signs and no clear risk factors for infection were identified.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Copyright: © 2019 The Author(s)
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/49796
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