Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Timing of in situ visual information pick-up that differentiates expert and near-expert anticipation in a complex motor skill

Rosalie, S.M. and Müller, S.ORCID: 0000-0001-5777-4953 (2013) Timing of in situ visual information pick-up that differentiates expert and near-expert anticipation in a complex motor skill. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66 (10). pp. 1951-1962.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2013.770044
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

The timing of visual information pick-up for visual anticipation was examined by comparing the capability of multiple skill groups, expert and near-expert karate athletes and novices, to block attacks using an in situ temporal occlusion paradigm. Participants stood facing a karate opponent and then attempted to block attacks (kicks and punches), whilst their vision of attacks was occluded: (a) prior to onset of opponent motion (O1), (b) after preparatory head movement (O2), and (c) after initiation of the attacking motion (O3). A no occlusion control condition provided complete vision of attacks (O4). Results revealed that expert anticipation was not significantly different to that of near-experts at O1, but was significantly different to the other group across O2-O4. Expert anticipation, however, was significantly above chance across all occlusion conditions, but near-experts performed above chance at O3 and O4, whilst novices were better than chance at O4. Unexpectedly, unique evidence was found that expert anticipation could be differentiated from near-expert anticipation in the earliest occlusion condition, where it was found that only experts were capable of using visual information from a static opponent to anticipate and block attacks above chance. The findings further understanding of expert visual anticipation to guide motor skills beyond existing expert-novice comparisons

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Copyright: © 2013 The Experimental Psychology Society
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/49789
Item Control Page Item Control Page