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The co-evolution of human brain size and birth timing: Implications for the ontogeny of attachment relationships

Lewis, A.J.ORCID: 0000-0002-2519-7976 (2004) The co-evolution of human brain size and birth timing: Implications for the ontogeny of attachment relationships. In: The International Neuropsychoanalysis Society Congress 2004, New York, USA

Abstract

Despite major efforts to reconstruct psychoanalysis from the ground up and under the invitation of some of the most eminent figures in the neurosciences, the neuro-psychoanalytic research program has to some extent neglected the integration of evolutionary biology. As a general theory of biological processes, evolutionary theory is implicit within Freud's work just as a neurological orientation is; however both require reinvigoration (see Badcock, Sulloway, Slavin). By recasting analytic theories of development in terms of the evolutionary shifts in human phylogenetic history, it is possible to provide a broader framework within which the constraints and characteristics of individual human psychological development can be understood, as well as individual variation in these developmental pathways This paper reviews one example of this bio-psychological methodology by examining the evolution of human brain size and its co-evolution with changes to the timing and form of human birth.

Item Type: Conference Paper
Conference Website: https://npsa-association.org/
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/49192
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