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Research Integrity: Perspectives from Australia and Netherland

Israel, M.ORCID: 0000-0002-1263-8699 and Drenth, P. (2016) Research Integrity: Perspectives from Australia and Netherland. In: Bretag, T., (ed.) Handbook of Academic Integrity. Springer, Singapore, pp. 789-808.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-098-8_64
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Abstract

In Australia and the Netherlands, research institutions and their funders, as well as academics, state integrity agencies, judges, governments, and journalists, have contributed to the development of rules and procedures that might help prevent, investigate, and respond to research fraud and misconduct. Both countries have experienced scandals and have ended up with codes, investigatory committees, and national research integrity committees.

National policy has created a series of expectations for research institutions. However, in both countries, the primary responsibility for research integrity remains with the institutions under whose auspices the research is carried out, as well as with the researchers themselves. Research institutions have to decide how to respond to misconduct, albeit in ways that are open to scrutiny by national advisory committees, the media, courts, and state accountability mechanisms. As a result, many institutions have amended and sharpened their own codes and regulations; refined their mechanisms for advising staff, reporting and investigating suspected misconduct, and responding to findings of misconduct; improved their protection rules for whistleblowers; regulated data storing and archiving; and sought to foster greater transparency in both their research and research integrity procedures. However, while researchers have been encouraged to embed awareness and acknowledgment of these principles through teaching, supervision, and mentoring of students and junior staff, less effort has been placed on resourcing good practice, tracing and understanding the causes of misconduct, and on fostering and entrenching a research culture invested with the values of professional responsibility and integrity.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Publisher: Springer, Singapore
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/48763
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