Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Nature‐Inspired design and application of lipidic lyotropic liquid crystals

Mezzenga, R., Seddon, J.M., Drummond, C.J., Boyd, B.J., Schröder-Turk, G.E. and Sagalowicz, L. (2019) Nature‐Inspired design and application of lipidic lyotropic liquid crystals. Advanced Materials, 31 (25).

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201900818
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Amphiphilic lipids aggregate in aqueous solution into a variety of structural arrangements. Among the plethora of ordered structures that have been reported, many have also been observed in nature. In addition, due to their unique morphologies, the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains, very high internal interfacial surface area, and the multitude of possible order−order transitions depending on environmental changes, very promising applications have been developed for these systems in recent years. These include crystallization in inverse bicontinuous cubic phases for membrane protein structure determination, generation of advanced materials, sustained release of bioactive molecules, and control of chemical reactions. The outstanding diverse functionalities of lyotropic liquid crystalline phases found in nature and industry are closely related to the topology, including how their nanoscopic domains are organized. This leads to notable examples of correlation between structure and macroscopic properties, which is itself central to the performance of materials in general. The physical origin of the formation of the known classes of lipidic lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, their structure, and their occurrence in nature are described, and their application in materials science and engineering, biology, medical, and pharmaceutical products, and food science and technology are exemplified.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education
Publisher: Wiley
Copyright: © 2019 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/48539
Item Control Page Item Control Page