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Visual-perceptual training with motor practice of the observed movement pattern improves anticipation in emerging expert cricket batsmen

Brenton, J., Müller, S.ORCID: 0000-0001-5777-4953 and Harbaugh, A.G. (2019) Visual-perceptual training with motor practice of the observed movement pattern improves anticipation in emerging expert cricket batsmen. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37 (18). pp. 2114-2121.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2019.1621510
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Abstract

This study addressed the paucity of evidence of whether visual anticipation can be improved in emerging experts in striking sports. Twelve emerging expert batsmen from a state cricket squad were equally randomised into intervention and control groups. They were pre-and-post tested on a video temporal occlusion test of a fast bowler, as well as transfer tests of different fast and slow bowlers. The intervention group received two sessions per week of point-light display temporal occlusion training with motor practice of the observed bowler’s action over a 4-week period. The control group completed only the testing phases. Batting averages before, during, and after the study were recorded for both groups. The intervention group, but not the control group, improved anticipation to significantly above chance level across pre-to-post-tests based upon pre-ball flight information. The intervention, but not the control, transferred their learning to anticipate significantly above chance level based upon pre-ball flight information across different fast and slow (spin) bowlers. Batting average of the intervention group was higher than the control group during the study. Findings indicate that the intervention can improve anticipation in emerging expert batsmen, beyond sport-specific practice. This improvement may benefit competition performance, but further evidence is required.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Psychology, Counselling, Exercise Science and Chiropractic
Publisher: Routledge
Copyright: © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/46346
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