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Influence of environmental temperature on home advantage in Qatari international soccer matches

Brocherie, F., Girard, O., Farooq, A. and Millet, G. (2013) Influence of environmental temperature on home advantage in Qatari international soccer matches. In: Peters, D.M. and O'Donoghue, P., (eds.) Performance Analysis of Sport IX. Routledge as part of the Taylor and Francis group.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203080443
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Abstract

With the announcement of the 2022 soccer World Cup to be held in Qatar, some participating countries’ medical and technical teams have expressed concerns regarding the adverse impact the heat may have upon their players’ performance and health. The climate in Qatar is a hot, arid and dry desert climate with an annual average temperature above 18°C and is classified as BWh (i.e. B: arid, W: desert and h: hot arid) in the Köppen-Geiger classification (Peel et al., 2007). As an example, the average temperature is 19°C ranging from 13°C to 22°C in the coolest month (i.e. January) while in the warmest month (i.e. July) the average is 37°C (range 34-41°C). According to Maughan et al. (2010), all players are affected by the environmental conditions, but players who are accustomed to living, training and competing in temperate climates are placed at a particular disadvantage when a game is played in hot and/or humid regions against a local team acclimatised to those conditions. Recently, Mohr et al. (2012) showed that heat stress lowers the total match distance and high intensity running, by comparing two experimental games of 90 min (i.e. played in temperate (~21°C) vs. hot ambient conditions (~43°C)) with Scandinavian elite male players.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Publisher: Routledge as part of the Taylor and Francis group
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/46328
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