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Changes in exercise characteristics, maximal voluntary contraction, and explosive strength during prolonged tennis playing

Girard, O., Lattier, G., Micallef, J-P and Millet, G.P. (2006) Changes in exercise characteristics, maximal voluntary contraction, and explosive strength during prolonged tennis playing. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 40 (6). pp. 521-526.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2005.023754
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Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
To examine changes in exercise characteristics, maximal voluntary contraction, and explosive strength during prolonged tennis playing.

METHODS:
Maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), leg stiffness (hopping), and peak power in squat (SJ) and countermovement (CMJ) jumps were measured before, every 30 minutes during, and 30 minutes after a three hour tennis match in 12 well trained players. Heart rate (HR), the effective playing time (EPT), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and muscle soreness of knee extensors were also measured.

RESULTS:
Decreases in MVC (-9%; p < 0.05) and leg stiffness (-9%; p = 0.17) were observed after the match and were significantly correlated (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). Peak power in SJ and CMJ tests was maintained during the match but was lower (p < 0.001) 30 minutes after. Average HR and EPT were 144 (8) beats/min and 21 (4)% respectively. A strong correlation was found between EPT and HR (r = 0.93; p < 0.05). RPE and muscle soreness increased linearly during the exercise and were significantly correlated (r = 0.99; p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:
Progressive reductions in maximal voluntary strength and leg stiffness highly correlated with increases in perceived exertion and muscle soreness were observed throughout a three hour tennis match, whereas explosive strength was maintained and decreased only after the match. These alterations may result in less efficient on-court movement and stroke production. They are, however, lower than those reported during continuous exercise of the same duration. The intermittent pattern of tennis and the numerous stretch-shortening cycle movements partly explain these results.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/45961
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