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Continuous non-destructive hydrocarbon extraction from Botryococcus braunii BOT-22

Mehta, P., Jackson, B.A., Nwoba, E.G., Vadiveloo, A.ORCID: 0000-0001-8886-5540, Bahri, P.A.ORCID: 0000-0003-4661-5644, Mathur, A.S. and Moheimani, N.R.ORCID: 0000-0003-2310-4147 (2019) Continuous non-destructive hydrocarbon extraction from Botryococcus braunii BOT-22. Algal Research, 41 . Article number 101537.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.algal.2019.101537
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Abstract

In-situ extraction of microalgal oil without cell destruction has been proposed as a cost-effective alternative solution for the production of algal biofuel. This study examines the viability and efficiency of n-dodecane in both column and shake flask systems for the continuous extraction of botryococcene from Botryococcus braunii (BOT-22). Botryococcene from B. braunii was found to be non-destructively extracted using n-dodecane without negatively affecting the growth and photophysiology of the microalgae. Recirculation of the culture (23 times per day)through a column system containing n-dodecane with a daily effective extraction time of 276 s resulted in 21% higher botryococcene extraction (25.1 mg g −1 biomass)when compared to a constantly stirred shake flask consisting of both algae culture and n-dodecane together in a vessel. Botryococcene extraction was highest in the first 24 h of extraction when compared to the rest of the extraction period. These results suggest that recirculation of B. braunii culture through a column system containing n-dodecane is efficient for the non-destructive extraction of botryococcene and less toxic compared to other previously tested solvents.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2019 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/45713
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