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Temporal expectancies affect accuracy in standard-comparison judgments of duration, but neither pitch height, nor timbre, nor loudness

Prince, J.B.ORCID: 0000-0002-8267-9963 and Sopp, M. (2019) Temporal expectancies affect accuracy in standard-comparison judgments of duration, but neither pitch height, nor timbre, nor loudness. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 45 (5). pp. 585-600.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000629
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Abstract

Presenting a stimulus at the most expected point in time should benefit its perceptual processing (Jones, 1976; Large & Jones, 1999). For example, accuracy decreases when comparing the pitch of two tones separated by a sequence of temporally regular distractors if the final tone is shifted away from the expected time (Jones, Moynihan, MacKenzie, & Puente, 2002). However, recent research could not replicate this effect (Bauer, Jaeger, Thorne, Bendixen, & Debener, 2015), so we explored possible explanations. First, we varied the size and probability of timing shifts of the comparison tone in 7 experimental combinations (N = 16 in each). Second, we strengthened temporal expectancies by using a rhythmically rich distractor sequence, either repeating the standard tone at the end of the sequence (N = 26) or not (N = 28). Third, we had listeners compare either the timbre (N = 55) or the loudness (N = 24) instead of pitch. No effects of temporal expectancy (nor interactions with musical training) emerged in these experiments; however, they did occur when participants judged the relative duration of time intervals (N = 38). That is, a temporal expectancy profile was only observable in the context of a temporal task, and did not generalize to other domains.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: American Psychological Association
Copyright: (c) 2019 APA
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/45502
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