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Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection and Australian food animals

Squire, M.M., Knight, D.R.ORCID: 0000-0002-9480-4733 and Riley, T.V. (2015) Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection and Australian food animals. Microbiology Australia . pp. 111-113.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1071/ma15040
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Abstract

Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic Gram positive spore-forming bacterium, the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea (C. difficile infection; CDI) in hospitalised humans. The assumption that CDI is primarily a hospital-acquired infection is being questioned. Community-acquired CDI (CA-CDI) is increasing particularly in groups previously considered at low risk. In Australia, CA-CDI rates doubled during 2011 and increased by 24% between 2011 and 2012. Two potentially high-risk practices in Australian food animal husbandry may present a risk for CA-CDI: slaughtering of neonatal animals for food, and effluent recycling to agriculture.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/45281
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