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Mind the Costs: Rescaling and Multi-Level Environmental Governance in Venice Lagoon

Roggero, M. and Fritsch, O.ORCID: 0000-0001-8995-8634 (2010) Mind the Costs: Rescaling and Multi-Level Environmental Governance in Venice Lagoon. Environmental Management, 46 (1). pp. 17-28.

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Abstract

Competences over environmental matters are distributed across agencies at different scales on a national-to-local continuum. This article adopts a transaction costs economics perspective in order to explore the question whether, in the light of a particular problem, the scale at which a certain competence is attributed can be reconsidered. Specifically, it tests whether a presumption of least-cost operation concerning an agency at a given scale can hold. By doing so, it investigates whether the rescaling of certain tasks, aiming at solving a scale-related problem, is likely to produce an increase in costs for day-to-day agency operations as compared to the status quo. The article explores such a perspective for the case of Venice Lagoon. The negative aspects of the present arrangement concerning fishery management and morphological remediation are directly linked to the scale of the agencies involved. The analysis suggests that scales have been chosen correctly, at least from the point of view of the costs incurred to the agencies involved. Consequently, a rescaling of those agencies does not represent a viable option.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Copyright: © 2010 The Author(s)
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/44648
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