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Hypoxia induces membrane depolarization and potassium loss from wheat roots but does not increase their permeability to sorbitol

Buwalda, F., Thomson, C.J., Steigner, W., Barrett-Lennard, E.G., Gibbs, J. and Greenway, H. (1988) Hypoxia induces membrane depolarization and potassium loss from wheat roots but does not increase their permeability to sorbitol. Journal of Experimental Botany, 39 (9). pp. 1169-1183.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/39.9.1169
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Abstract

This paper deals with the responses of roots of wheat {Triticum aestivum L.) to hypoxia with special emphasis on the effects of severe O2 deficiency on membrane integrity, loss of K+ from the root and root membrane potentials.

Seminal and crown roots of 26-d-old plants exposed to severe hypoxia (0.003 mol O2 m−3) for 3 h or 10 d prior to excision and subsequently exposed to hypoxic solutions, had slightly lower rates of sorbitol influx and a slightly smaller apparent free space than roots in aerated solutions. These results indicate that neither a few hours nor a 10-d exposure to hypoxia had adverse effects on the membrane integrity of the bulk of the cells in the roots. However, both 6-d-old seedlings and 26-d-old plants lost K+ from the roots following their transfer from aerated to hypoxic nutrient solutions. In the 26-d-old plants, which were of high nutritional status, there was a net K+ efflux from the roots to the external solution. In contrast, with the 6-d-old seedlings, which were of low nutritional status, the decrease in the K+ content of the roots was smaller than the net K+ uptake to the shoots.

Exposure of excised roots to 0.008 mol O2 m−3caused a rapid and reversible membrane depolarization from −120 to −–80 mV. These data and the magnitude of the net effluxes strongly suggest that K+ losses during the early stages of hypoxia are due to membrane depolarization rather than to increases in the permeability of membranes to K +.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Copyright: © 1988 Oxford University Press
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/43613
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