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Developmental experiences during extracurricular activities and Australian adolescents’ self-concept: particularly important for youth from disadvantaged schools

Blomfield, C.J. and Barber, B.L. (2011) Developmental experiences during extracurricular activities and Australian adolescents’ self-concept: particularly important for youth from disadvantaged schools. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40 (5). pp. 582-594.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-010-9563-0
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Abstract

Extracurricular activities provide adolescents with a number of positive personal and interpersonal developmental experiences. This study investigated whether developmental experiences that occurred during extracurricular activities were linked to a more positive self-concept for Australian adolescents, and whether this link was particularly salient for youth from disadvantaged schools. Adolescents (N = 1,504, 56% Female) from 26 diverse high schools across Western Australia were surveyed. The findings revealed that adolescents from low socio-economic status schools who participated in extracurricular activities had a more positive general self-worth and social self-concept than adolescents from similar socio-economic schools who did not participate in any extracurricular activities. Furthermore, the positive developmental experiences that occurred during extracurricular activities predicted a more positive general self-worth and social and academic self-concept, and this link was stronger for youth from low SES schools. These findings suggest that the developmental experiences afforded by extracurricular activities may foster positive adolescent development.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): School of Psychology
Publisher: Springer
Copyright: © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4317
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