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Co-cultivation and stepwise cultivation of Chaetoceros muelleri and Amphora sp. for fucoxanthin production under gradual salinity increase

Ishika, T., Laird, D.W.ORCID: 0000-0001-7550-4607, Bahri, P.A.ORCID: 0000-0003-4661-5644 and Moheimani, N.R.ORCID: 0000-0003-2310-4147 (2019) Co-cultivation and stepwise cultivation of Chaetoceros muelleri and Amphora sp. for fucoxanthin production under gradual salinity increase. Journal of Applied Phycology, 31 (3). pp. 1535-1544.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10811-018-1718-5
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Abstract

In a seawater-based open pond microalgae cultivation system salinity will increase gradually over time due to evaporative loss. Continuous salinity increase would lead to non-optimal salinities which negatively affect the biomass and fucoxanthin productivity. To increase and maintain high overall biomass and fucoxanthin productivity, even in the non-optimal salinity zone, two cultivation methods for marine and halotolerant microalgae were carried out, co-cultivation and stepwise cultivation (sequential cultivation). Two fucoxanthin-producing diatoms, Chaetoceros muelleri (marine) and Amphora sp. (halotolerant), were cultivated at non-optimal salinities between 59 and 65‰. Stepwise cultivation showed approximately 63% higher total biomass and 47% higher fucoxanthin productivity than that of co-culture. The ability to reutilize culture media in the stepwise cultivation increases the sustainability of that method. The use of a stepwise culture regime, coupled with a regimen of gradually increasing salinity, provides the possibility of year round fucoxanthin production from microalgae.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Algae R&D Centre
School of Engineering and Information Technology
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Copyright: © 2019 Springer Nature B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/43164
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