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RFID tags for the expedition of body part processing in large scale disaster victim identification incidents: A cost and feasibility pilot study

De Almeida, Tiana (2018) RFID tags for the expedition of body part processing in large scale disaster victim identification incidents: A cost and feasibility pilot study. Masters by Coursework thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

In 2001, over 2,000 lives were lost at the World Trade Center. Approximately 280,000 deceased victims were a result of the Asian tsunami of 2004, and 168 fatalities after the Oklahoma bombing in 1995. Whether the disaster incident is large or small, the legal responsibility falls on forensic investigators to positively identify every victim, for the purpose of returning the remains to their respective families. In forensic science and more specifically, disaster victim identification (DVI), an unforeseen incident can result in the demise of a mass of lives. Identifying the fallen victims is of vital importance. Highly skilled specialists and investigators are involved in the DVI processes in order to expedite the processing of body parts. However, a research gap remains in regard to the timeliness of human remain examinations at large scale DVI incidents. The expedition of DVI investigations is crucial as it impacts the number of positive identifications that are made, whilst issues such as decomposition may challenge forensic investigators. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology is an advanced system that transmits a radio signal, in order to track and identify objects. This review aims to demonstrate how RFID technology has the ability to significantly decrease forensic examination and identification time of victims, through sub-dermal implantation of microchips into human remains. Although the cost of implementing RFID is a limitation, the technology has proven to be successful in several organisations on an international scale and has been effective through sub-dermal implantation in humans as well as animals. Through utilising RFID, forensic investigators and legal authorities will be equipped to conduct an expeditious DVI process and hence, determine a greater amount of positive deceased victim identifications.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters by Coursework)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Supervisor(s): Chapman, Brendan
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/43037
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