Catalog Home Page

Lung transplant: the Western Australian experience

Dhillon, S., McKinnon, E., Wrobel, J., Lavender, M., Lawrence, S., Gabbay, E. and Musk, M. (2018) Lung transplant: the Western Australian experience. Internal Medicine Journal, 48 (11). pp. 1337-1345.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1111/imj.14001
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Background
The Western Australian lung transplant programme commenced in 2004 to serve the growing demand of patients with end‐stage lung disease.

Aim
This report summarises our 11‐year experience in lung transplantation.

Methods
Data on 115 consecutive patients and their respective donors transplanted between 2004 and 2015 were collected. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate survival. Cox regression was used to analyse the impact of donor and recipient characteristics on survival.

Results
A total of 88 bilateral, 22 single‐lung and 5 heart‐lung transplants were performed in Western Australia during the first 11 years of the lung transplant programme. The most common indications for transplantation were interstitial lung disease (30.4%), cystic fibrosis (27.8%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (excluding alpha‐1 antitrypsin deficiency) (22.6%). Median recipient age was 50 years. Overall survival rates were 96% at 3 months, 93% at 1 year, 84% at 3 years and 70% at 5 years. Older age and higher BMI negatively impacted survival. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction was the leading cause of late mortality.

Conclusion
Lung transplantation is a treatment option in end‐stage lung disease, with annual transplant rates in Western Australia continuing to rise. Our patients enjoy survival rates that compare favourably against international standards.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases
Publisher: Wiley
Copyright: © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/42553
Item Control Page Item Control Page