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Research protocol for the exploration of experiences of Aboriginal Australian mothers and healthcare professionals when using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: a process-oriented validation study using triangulated participatory mixed methods

Chan, A-W, Skeffington, P., Reid, C. and Marriott, R. (2018) Research protocol for the exploration of experiences of Aboriginal Australian mothers and healthcare professionals when using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: a process-oriented validation study using triangulated participatory mixed methods. BMJ Open, 8 (10). e022273.

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Adopting a process-oriented framework for test validation can help to establish whether this tool has the potential to be an acceptable, valid and reliable indicator of depression for mothers and mothers-to-be. This mixed-methods research protocol seeks to explore the views and experiences of Aboriginal mothers and healthcare professionals in relation to the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), and is intended to highlight potential barriers in perinatal mental health conceptualisation, engagement and response style.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Thematic analysis will be applied to interview transcripts of Aboriginal Australian mothers (n=6+) and healthcare professionals (n=6+) to identify key themes. The process-focused validation model will use narratives about experiences of using the EPDS as the priority point of analysis. Item-level data and process-level (experience) data are key phenomenological data. The interview-based narratives will be then compared with EPDS scores to check for points of congruence and divergence. This will be done at two time points, antenatally and postnatally, to assess changes in assessment processes and perceptions. Bridging evidence-based research with clinical practice in an Aboriginal Australian context will be facilitated by an investigation of the perceived cultural relevance and likely clinical effectiveness of EPDS. Such evidence is critical to understanding whether the EPDS fulfils its intended purpose. The guiding principles in designing this research protocol is to benefit the well-being of young Aboriginal families and communities through partnership with Aboriginal women.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was obtained from Human Research Ethics Committee of Murdoch University and from Western Australian Aboriginal Health Ethics Committee (WAAHEC). Participating healthcare sites and services have provided letters of support. Results of this study will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Health Professions
School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: BMJ Open
Copyright: © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018
UNSD Goals: Goal 3: Good Health and Well-being
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/42339
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