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The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis

Kinnett-Hopkins, D., Learmonth, Y.ORCID: 0000-0002-4857-8480, Hubbard, E., Pilutti, L., Roberts, S., Fanning, J., Wójcicki, T., McAuley, E. and Motl, R. (2017) The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis. Disability and Rehabilitation, 41 (2). pp. 166-171.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2017.1383519
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Abstract

Objectives: This study adopted a qualitative research design with directed content analysis and examined the interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour by persons with multiple sclerosis.

Methods: Fifty three persons with multiple sclerosis who were enrolled in an exercise trial took part in semi-structured interviews regarding personal interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours.

Results: Forty three percent of participants indicated a consistent understanding of physical activity, 42% of participants indicated a consistent understanding of exercise, and 83% of participants indicated a consistent understanding of sedentary behaviour with the standard definitions. There was evidence of definitional ambiguity (i.e., 57, 58, and 11% of the sample for physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour, respectively); 6% of the sample inconsistently defined sedentary behaviour with standard definitions. Some participants described physical activity in a manner that more closely aligned with exercise and confused sedentary behaviour with exercise or sleeping/napping.

Conclusions: Results highlight the need to provide and utilise consistent definitions for accurate under- standing, proper evaluation and communication of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis.

Practice implications: The application of consistent definitions may minimise ambiguity, alleviate the equivocality of findings in the literature, and translate into improved communication about these behaviours in multiple sclerosis.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41975
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