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Effects of natural products on several stages of the spore cycle of Clostridium difficile in vitro

Roshan, N., Riley, T.V. and Hammer, K.A. (2018) Effects of natural products on several stages of the spore cycle of Clostridium difficile in vitro. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 125 (3). pp. 710-723.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1111/jam.13889
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Abstract

Aims
To investigate the effect of natural products on the spore cycle of Clostridium difficile in vitro.

Methods and Results
Twenty‐two natural products were investigated using four C. difficile strains. Effects on sporulation, determined using microscopy and a conventional spore recovery assay, showed that fresh onion bulb extract (6·3% v v−1) and coconut oil (8% v v−1) inhibited sporulation in all four isolates by 66–86% and 51–88%, respectively, compared to untreated controls. Fresh ginger rhizome extract (25% v v−1) was also inhibitory, although to a lesser extent. Using a standard spore germination and outgrowth assay, germination was unaffected by the 22 products, whereas outgrowth was significantly reduced by artichoke extract (18·8 mg ml−1), fresh onion bulb extract (25% v v−1), Leptospermumhoneys (8% w v−1) and allicin (75 mg ml−1; P < 0·01). Sporicidal activity, investigated using a standard plate recovery assay, was minimal.

Conclusions
Three of the 22 natural products (13%) showed inhibitory effects on sporulation of C. difficile and six products (27%) reduced vegetative outgrowth of C. difficile.

Significance and Impact of the Study
This study shows the potential of natural products to inhibit different stages of C. difficilesporulation and encourages further investigation in this field.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: Wiley
Copyright: © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41821
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