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Vitamin D Content of Australian Native Food Plants and Australian-Grown Edible Seaweed

Hughes, L.J., Black, L.J., Sherriff, J.L., Dunlop, E., Strobel, N., Lucas, R.M. and Bornman, J.F. (2018) Vitamin D Content of Australian Native Food Plants and Australian-Grown Edible Seaweed. Nutrients, 10 (7). p. 876.

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Abstract

Vitamin D has previously been quantified in some plants and algae, particularly in leaves of the Solanaceae family. We measured the vitamin D content of Australian native food plants and Australian-grown edible seaweed. Using liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, 13 samples (including leaf, fruit, and seed) were analyzed in duplicate for vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Five samples contained vitamin D2: raw wattleseed (Acacia victoriae) (0.03 µg/100 g dry weight (DW)); fresh and dried lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves (0.03 and 0.24 µg/100 g DW, respectively); and dried leaves and berries of Tasmanian mountain pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata) (0.67 and 0.05 µg/100 g DW, respectively). Fresh kombu (Lessonia corrugata) contained vitamin D3 (0.01 µg/100 g DW). Detected amounts were low; however, it is possible that exposure to ultraviolet radiation may increase the vitamin D content of plants and algae if vitamin D precursors are present.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: MDPI AG
Copyright: © 2018 by the authors
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41729
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