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Quantitative analysis of anxiety levels of nursing students studying bioscience in Australia

Mortimer-Jones, S.M., Wall, P.G. and Russell, S. (2018) Quantitative analysis of anxiety levels of nursing students studying bioscience in Australia. Nursing & Health Sciences, 20 (4). pp. 452-457.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1111/nhs.12535
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Abstract

Nursing students traditionally find bioscience difficult and anxiety provoking. This has important ramifications, as anxiety can hinder comprehension and lead to poor exam performance. The aim of the present study was to assess whether there was any difference between the anxiety levels of nursing students during their bioscience laboratory classes compared to their clinical laboratory classes. Students were recruited from a first year Bachelor of Nursing program. The self‐report State–Trait Anxiety Inventory (short form) was administered at the start of all classes throughout the semester. Anxiety scores of students between the units were compared using paired t‐tests, and repeated‐measures analysis of variance was used to measure anxiety scores within units over time. There were no significant differences in anxiety scores in the bioscience and clinical classes; however, the students were significantly more anxious in the theory classes. These findings suggest that nursing students do not find the subject of bioscience any more anxiety provoking than other nursing subjects. Bioscience educators should continue to focus on the integration of bioscience with nursing practice, while broader anxiety‐reduction strategies throughout the curriculum should be implemented.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Health Professions
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing
Copyright: © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41710
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